Vespers: Feast of the Holy Family

Today is the feast of the Holy Family. Here is the Immaculate Heart of Mary Schola joined by a few of the monks of Papa Stronsay singing Vespers of this feast day in 2019. You can follow with this booklet. The hymn at 18.02 is particularly beautiful.

The collect of the feast is a mission statement for every family:

COLLECT O Lord Jesus Christ, You sanctified home life with untold virtues by being subject to Mary and Joseph. May they assist us to imitate the example of Your Holy Family, so that we may share with them their eternal happiness; who lives and rules with God the Father . . .

Learn about the Three Hearts Devotion Here

Heart of Jesus I adore thee,

Heart of Mary I implore thee,

Heart of Joseph pure and just,

In these Three Hearts I place my trust.

Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus

Happy feast of the Holy Name of Jesus!

For which cause God also hath exalted him, and hath given him a name which is above all names: That in the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of those that are in heaven, on earth, and under the earth: And that every tongue should confess that the Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father Phillipians 2:9-11

The Latin original is by St Bernard of Clairvaux and the translation below is by Fr Edward Caswell, a convert from Anglicanism and collaborator of Saint John Henry Newman. There isn’t a suitable recording of this hymn online to share but nonetheless, the English provides material for hours of meditation.

Jesus, the very thought of Thee With sweetness fills the breast! Yet sweeter far Thy face to see And in Thy Presence rest.

No voice can sing, no heart can frame, Nor can the memory find, A sweeter sound than Jesus’ Name, The Saviour of mankind.

O hope of every contrite heart! O joy of all the meek! To those who fall, how kind Thou art! How good to those who seek!

But what to those who find? Ah! this Nor tongue nor pen can show The love of Jesus, what it is, None but His loved ones know.

Jesus! our only hope be Thou, As Thou our prize shalt be; In Thee be all our glory now,And through eternity. Amen.

Plenary Indulgence: First Day of the Year

“Come, Holy Spirit, Creator Blest.” (Veni Creator) PLENARY INDULGENCE if recited on the first of January or on the feast of the Pentecost. Otherwise, a partial indulgence is granted to those who recite it. No 61 Enchiridion of Indulgences.

Conditions: Holy Commuion , Confession, Prayers for the Pope’s intentions (Ave, Pater, Gloria Patri).

A new look at ‘O Come All Ye faithful’

From Fr Martin Cochem’s Explanation of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass

This last verse of this carol takes on a whole new significance when looked at through Eucharistic eyes. Wilcocks penned the greatest chord in the repertoire for “WORD of the Father now in flesh appearing.” This is not only true of the incarnation but at the consecration in every Mass. The holy spirit overshadows the priest as He did Our Blessed Lady and the Eternal Word is Made Flesh.

Venite Adoremus!

The Fourth Sunday of Advent, the origin of the Hail Mary

During Advent, the Sacred Liturgy is replete with references to the Blessed Virgin Mary who bore the Word Made Flesh in Her womb. From prophesies about the tender shoot that came from the root of Jesse to chant motifs appearing in the propers, Our Lady is evoked and invoked continually.

Today, I was astounded to learn that the origin of the Hail Mary that we pray so regularly finds its origin in the offertory chant of today’s Mass. I was aware that the ‘Holy Mary Mother of God’ part of the prayer was added later but according to the liturgical scholar Fr Lasance, the first time that the angelic salutation (Hail Mary) and the greeting of St Elizabeth (Blessed art thou among women) were placed together was in the offertory chant of today’s Mass.

This chant dates back to the Gregorian Antiphonary (compiled by Pope Gregory the Great, 6th century) used in the early Roman basilicas which was widely considered to have been inspired by the Holy Spirit and therefore untouchable- and we sang it this morning!

Rorate Caeli, The Advent Prose

Appointed to be sung at Benediction during Advent, the Rorate Caeli is a meditation on our desperate need for the Lord. References from the Old Testament remind us of the darkness of e world before it knew the light of Christ yet provide a stark meditation on the state of our world which awaits the second coming. After verses of lamentation and the refrain pleading for the Messiah, the final verse offers the hope of deliverance.

Comfort ye, comfort ye my people;
my salvation shall not tarry:
why wilt thou waste away in sadness?
why hath sorrow seized thee?
Fear not, for I will save thee:
For I am the Lord thy God,
the Holy One of Israel, thy Redeemer.

I love this old recording. Something about the emotion and the French accent.

See the description on the YouTube video for the translation of the text.

Video: Si Iniquitates, Wesley

As we move towards the end of the Church year and during the month of the Holy Souls, the De Profundis has appeared regularly in the liturgy. Even today’s introit contains motifs from the Requiem introit and the De Profundis sung at the offertory had phrases from the Libera Me.

Here is a video of the offertory motet from this morning’s Missa Cantata, Si Iniquitates, verse two of the De Profundus, set by Samuel Wesley.

Requiem Sequence: Dies Irae

The sequence of the Requiem Mass is both an exquisite piece of poetry and a striking meditation on the four last things. It is quite astounding that this prose was supressed in the new Mass of Paul VI and even the tract is replaced with the Alleluia! This is key to understanding the principle ‘lex Orlando, lex credendi’ because this change in the prayer of the church signifies a significant change in belief.

The Dies Irae provides a sobering meditation to us and excites a keen desire to pray for the Holy Souls. May we all redouble our efforts to assist them by our prayer, fasting, almsgiving, indulgences and Masses.

In a lighter note, here is a presentation about the influence that the chant of the Dies Irae has had on popular culture.